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A MOVEMENT BEGINS

1977

Led by Lucy Sayre, a group of wealthy women formed a movement that would eventually become the most influential voice for children in Philadelphia and beyond. Driven by a moral obligation to protect children and an extraordinary amount of energy for organizing citizens toward justice, the founding members came together through a shared conviction that attention and advocacy were required to reverse the deplorable state of child welfare in Philadelphia.

1978

Lucy Sayre and her band of motivated women — Christie (Cricket) Hastings, Ruth Madden, Happy Fernandez, Marciene Mattlelman, and Margaret Estey — inspire Lucy’s husband, Robert W. Sayre, to use his influence to help form Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth. In his first year as a lawyer at Saul, Ewing, Remick and Saul, Rich Frazier, Esq., on the request of Mr. Sayre, files the documents to create the new non-profit to help kids in Philadelphia. 40-years later, Mr. Fraizer continues his relationship with PCCY as a donor and counselor. 

1979

The all-volunteer Citizens Committee on Services to Children and Youth in Philadelphia publishes its first study, “Improving the Delivery of Services to Philadelphia Citizens and Youth”. The study finds that the needs of Philadelphia children are not being met, and the delivery of services necessary to support them is inadequate. Recognizing that the unmet needs are threatening the quality of life for all Philadelphia citizens, PCCY makes more than 40 recommendations.

PCCY released its first report titled "Improving the Delivery of Services to Philadelphia Children and Youth" 

1970s

Mainline Queens Who Became Kingmakers

Led by Lucy Sayre, a group of wealthy women formed a movement that would eventually become the most influential voice for children in Philadelphia and beyond. Driven by a moral obligation to protect children and an extraordinary amount of energy for organizing citizens toward justice, the founding members came together through a shared conviction that attention and advocacy were required to reverse the deplorable state of child welfare in Philadelphia.

1980

The Citizens Committee on Services to Children and Youth is formed to study the barriers to service for children and recommend how to reduce them.  Recommendations developed in conjunction with the Fels Institute for the University of Pennsylvania and the United Way of Southeastern PA include the creation of a citizens’ watchdog to monitor the child-serving system; to fulfil this need, PCCY was founded in 1980.

1981

Beth McDade is hired as the first Executive Director of PCCY in September 1981. In the early years, the organization is Board driven, and Beth is brought on to help keep the organization moving toward funding and media coverage.  She brings 20 years’ experience in administration and service delivery to children at the federal, state, local and voluntary levels.
In January, PCCY released the report, "An Approach to Change for Children."

1982

Secures Foundation Grants

In its second year of operation, PCCY secures two foundation grants: Pew Charitable Trust (then Pew Memorial Trust), Philadelphia Foundation, a corporate donor Glaxo, Smith, Kline (then SmithKline, Corp.), and $1,500 in private donations. The United Way of Philadelphia allows PCCY to set up shop and eventually becomes a key funder.

Task Force on Child Welfare and Education

PCCY sets concrete goals to shape a modern-day model. Establishing itself as a research, monitoring, communications and problem-solving organization helped lay the groundwork for what continues to set PCCY apart from the pack. In 1982, PCCY creates two task forces: child welfare and education.

"Trustworthy, accurate, unbiased."

Rich Frazier, Former Board Treasurer, PCCY

1983

The Juvenile Justice Committee is formed with a goal to cause “the system” to make rational child centered decisions about youth in the Juvenile Justice system.

1984

Meeting with Mayor Wilson Goode to replace the Commissioner of Human Services

John Riggan, Former Board President

1985

1986

1987

Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode and City Council answer PCCY’s call to combat teen pregnancy and infant mortality by establishing three teen health clinics across Philadelphia to provide comprehensive care to adolescents.

PCCY launches a public campaign to increase child enrollment in Medicaid. PCCY staff and volunteers work in schools, helping parents register their children.

PCCY launches partnerships with community organizations to help families secure healthcare for their children.

PCCY begins major campaign initiatives to improve the meals, safety, education and support for children in shelters.

1988

As part of a city-wide campaign to focus on improving the lives of homeless children launched a year earlier, a new PCCY report looks at the conditions of children living in Philadelphia homeless shelters. The City’s homeless program director recognizes unmet needs and blames insufficient funding as reasons for the inability to address them.

PCCY Founder, Lucy Sayre receives the Mellon Good Neighbor Award. The $10,000 gift that accompanies the award is put toward a PCCY study of foster care for children.

1989

PCCY executive director and board member Robert Schwartz gave testimony to the State Government Commission Task Force on Services to Children and Youth on services rendered to children relative to problems of abuse, delinquency, dependency, neglect and mental health leading to critical changes in those systems.

In January, PCCY released the report, "The Health Status of Philadelphia's Children".

1980’s

Decade of Deep Dedication

The 1980’s was a tough time to be a poor kid in Philadelphia.  Issues multiplied as corruption and incompetency contributed to a weak child welfare system. The system of services and programs for children in Philadelphia were in crisis. In early 1980, Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth was incorporated as a non-profit — its primary mission is to improve the delivery of publicly mandated services to children and youth in Philadelphia.

1990

PCCY responds to years of state cuts in child welfare programs by issuing reports and organizing a march on Harrisburg, bringing trainloads of people including the Mayor and City Council representatives to focus attention on the needs of children, by filing a lawsuit against the state and by testifying at several hearings. As a result, Pennsylvania establishes a new formula for funding child welfare programs that increases funding from the state.

PCCY draws attention to the problem of lead poisoning in the city by issuing reports, persuading City Council to hold hearings, helping create lead court, and briefing judges on the impact of the problem.

Educating People about Lead Paint Poisoning

Mary Goldman, Former PCCY Health Staffer

PCCY Health Committee Chair, Dr. Donald Schwartz testifies at a Healthy Start hearing before U.S. Subcommittee on General Services and Federalism, continuing to build the case for prenatal care and health coverage for all.

1991

The PCCY report on poverty youth statistics becomes the vehicle for United Way of Southeastern PA to launch Success by Six program in Philadelphia, aimed at breaking the cycle of poverty.

Leadership

Bob Schwartz, Co-Founder Juvenile Law Center & Former Board Member, PCCY

1992

PCCY teams with stakeholders across PA to urge lawmakers to pass legislation establishing the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Not only does the legislation pass, but PA CHIP becomes the model for the Federal government’s CHIP Program, which has been adopted by all fifty states.

PCCY organizes petitions and volunteers, builds publicity to ensure that all 79 public pools in Philadelphia open on time.

PCCY works to simplify/streamline the CHIP application process, holds hearings and launches its Child Health Watch Helpline, a hotline to assist parents in obtaining Medicaid and CHIP for their children.

PCCY teams up to create a grassroots project to equip city playgrounds with swings: The Philadelphia Swing project attracts thousands of dollars to create “places to dream” for city children.

1993

PCCY teams up with the Philadelphia Daily News to create the PCCY/Daily News Fund to support youth touched by violence.

1994

PCCY/Fresh Ink Teen Survival Guide is published, offering a comprehensive list of all services for teenagers in Philadelphia. Billed as a teenager’s guide to “what to do in Philadelphia” it also offers free and confidential information on services available to teens, including testing for STD’s, accessing birth control and family planning.

1995

Full-day kindergarten is expanded in
the Philadelphia School District

1996

PCCY is selected as the regional coordinator of the Stand for Children March on Washington. PCCY mobilized thousands of individuals, more than 100 community organizations and organized hundreds of buses to travel to Washington, D.C. in June 1996. It was said that Philadelphia had the fourth or fifth largest contingent of advocates attending the rally.

1997

Shelly Yanoff is honored for her work on behalf of children with the Gimbel Philadelphia Award, recognizing a Philadelphia woman who has made a significant contribution to the arts, education or another field.

1998

Summer Playstreets

PCCY and the Philadelphia Department of Recreation launch the “Summer Playstreets Program”, which encourages neighbors to close off their blocks during the daytime in summer to provide safe zones for children to play. PCCY helps organize neighbors who assist with providing free lunches and non-violent games to hundreds of children in the program.

Maternal and Infant Care

PCCY launches a maternal and infant care program to increase support for visits during pregnancy and better follow up with infants after mother and child leave the hospital.

Eagles & Phillies Fund

PCCY, together with the City, the Mayor, the United Way, the Eagles and the Phillies launches a $120 million fund to benefit the children of Philadelphia ($2 million a year for 20 years from the teams).

1999

Playstreets Program

PCCY secures new sporting equipment for the Philadelphia Playstreets program through the Rawlings/Kenny Rogers (The Greatest) promotion. PCCY is a civic partner to the Philadelphia Department of Recreation helping volunteer playstreet leaders who are permitted to close off their blocks for use of kids during summer months and secure resources including equipment, games, and materials.

"PCCY truly enriches the lives of Philadelphia youth by offering a safe haven for play," said Tim Richards, corporate events manager for Rawlings. "Not only are we proud to donate equipment to such a worthy cause, but we are also excited about the prospect of making summer more enjoyable for these kids."

Philadelphia Office of Child Care

PCCY plays an integral role in the creation and organizing of the Philadelphia Office of Child Care, announced by then Mayor Ed Rendell on his last day in office.

Harriet Dichter, Deputy Director of Philadelphia Citizens for Children and Youth and Partner, Child Care Matters, "At last, families, child care programs and businesses will have a face and a place within city government, on child care.”

1990’s

Influence and Issues

As Philadelphia reels from funding cuts of the 1980’s, and years of state cuts in child welfare programs pile up, PCCY protests and responds by issuing reports and organizing thousands of citizens in the name of children. PCCY is growing its docket of issues and extends its reach.  The 90’s show PCCY is able to command the ear of lawmakers and corporate and civic leaders across the region. PCCY is at the table as CHIP is created to extend free health insurance to children across the Commonwealth and in the room developing a $120 million fund fueled by Philadelphia sport teams to benefit the children of Philadelphia.

2000

CHIP Outreach Award

Presented by the PA Department of Insurance to recognize PCCY’s efforts in enrolling children in the State’s Children’s Health Insurance Program.

Vote for Kids Project

In advance of the Presidential election, PCCY asked children in our region what were their top priorities for the next president.

2001

Medicaid Outreach Award

Presented by the PA Department of Public Welfare honoring PCCY for helping area families overcome barriers and obtain free, comprehensive health coverage for their children.

"Waiting in Line"

PCCY, in conjunction with the United Way of Southeastern PA, released a report on the housing crisis in Philadelphia titled "Waiting in Line: Low Income Families and the Search for Housing".

2002

PICASSO PROJECT

PCCY launches The Picasso Project, a mini-grant arts program. Schools from across the city apply for the grants, which are funded through individual donors, corporations and foundations.

COURTWATCH NEWSLETTER

PCCY continues its Courtwatch newsletter which trains citizen volunteers to sit in on Juvenile Court hearings and issue annual reports on juvenile justice in Philadelphia.

GIVE BACK THE GIVE BACK

When the state announces it will refund a portion of personal income tax payments, PCCY launches the “Give Back the Give Back” campaign to encourage people to donate their refund payments to programs for children.

2003

1% More for Kids

PCCY launches the “1% More for Kids Campaign” to urge Philadelphia Mayoral candidates to commit an additional 1% of the City’s budget (about $35 million at the time) to programming for children and families. Both Mayoral candidates express support for the idea, and it happens.

Pre-K Counts

With the guidance and advocacy of PCCY, Pennsylvania creates the Pre-K Counts program to provide high-quality, publicly funded pre-kindergarten to 11,000 3- and 4-year-olds.

PCCY publishes "A Manual for School Nurses and Counselors in Southeastern Pennsylvania"

2004

COURTWATCH REPORT

PCCY releases its sixth Courtwatch Report to the media showing the power of its volunteer base, and staying power of PCCY. The report is based on more than a dozen PCCY-trained volunteers who sat, observed and noted the proceedings in more than 750 delinquency hearings at Philadelphia Family Court.

SAVE THE CHILDREN

PCCY joins Save the Children Camp Fund Partnership alongside Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs, NAACP, Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News to help reduce violence by creating an opportunity for inner-city youth to attend a weeklong overnight camp in Pottstown PA.

PROTECTING OUR CHILDREN FROM VIOLENCE

PCCY hosts six "Forging our Future" forums to raise awareness around issues through the voices of nationally recognized experts.

2005

PEACE HIGH SCHOOL

PCCY helps create one of the first “peace” public high schools in the country. Parkway Northwest High School for Peace and Social Justice opens and provides problem-solving, conflict resolution and peer mediation programs in addition to more traditional subjects.

2006

GIVE KIDS A SMILE DAY

After reporting on the extensive unmet oral health needs of children in the region, PCCY teams up with area dentists to provide free dental care to hundreds of children through the very first “Give Kids a Smile Day.” PCCY continues to hold this event – which has expanded to become a week of free dental care – on an annual basis.

2007

STUDENT TRANSPORTATION PASS

After more than a decade of PCCY advocacy for safe transportation to and from school for Philadelphia children, SEPTA launches the “Student Transportation Pass” which provides free or low-cost transportation for thousands of children across the City.

PHILADELPHIA YOUTH COMMISSON

At PCCY’s urging, Philadelphia City Council and the Mayor agree to a ballot referendum to establish the Philadelphia Youth Commission as a city government entity to develop and recommend strategies to improve the lives of Philadelphia’s youth.

A NAME CHANGE

To reflect its growing work in the counties surrounding Philadelphia, PCCY changes its name to “Public Citizens for Children and Youth.”

"The Organization's Expansion Outside of Philadelphia"

Sara Nerken, former Board member of PCCY

REPORTS

PCCY released:
"Courtwatch 2007, Juvenile Justice in Philadelphia: Strengthening the voice of the city's most vulnerable children"
"Every School Should Have… A Good School Climate and Effective Behavioral Health Supports"

2007 brought increased recognition around the city of the need for supporting arts in public education, as well as an award from the Philadelphia Human Rights Commission. 

2008

Picasso Project funds 17 school- based arts projects, and releases two reports that highlighted the urgent need for arts education funding to Philadelphia’s schools: “Anchoring and Amplifying the Arts in Our Schools,” and “Listen To My Story... Tell Me Yours.”

2009

GIVE KIDS SIGHT DAY

PCCY teams with Wills Eye Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University, the First Philadelphia Foundation and the School District to provide a day of free vision care for children called “Give Kids Sight Day.” Doctors treat 1,200 children, and Give Kids Sight Day is now an annual event treating over 1,000 children each year.

2000’s

Children Take Center Stage

PCCY is beginning to extend its service arm: signing children up for CHIP, while organizing free eye care and dental care. The needs of children and youth across the region are pulling PCCY beyond the city borders, and to reflect its growing work in the counties surrounding Philadelphia, PCCY changes its name to “Public Citizens for Children and Youth.” PCCY remains firmly planted in its roots advocating for children and finding creative ways to break through the critically complex and myriad needs facing children and youth.

"The Reliability of PCCY"

Linda Wright Moore, former Director of Communications

2011

LEAD-SAFE ORDINANCE

PCCY’s reports and testimony on the number of children in Philadelphia suffering from lead poisoning leads City Council to pass an ordinance requiring Philadelphia landlords to certify that properties rented to families with children under six are lead-safe.

ADVOCACY ON EDUCATION FUNDING

PCCY continually testifies, organizes and advocates for increased support for early childhood programs and public school funding.

2012

PICASSO PROJECT

Over the course of three years, the Picasso Project funds 44 collaborative visual arts, dance, music, theater, and digital media projects. Through these projects, teachers and students, from grant recipient schools are mobilized to engage in strategic and coordinated arts advocacy campaigns.

The Philadelphia Inquirer May 29, 2015

YANOFF RETIREMENT

Shelly Yanoff passes the torch for children to a new kind of leader.  Donna Cooper, who served as Deputy Mayor under then Mayor Ed Rendell and Pennsylvania Secretary for Policy and Planning under Governor Ed Rendell, sets a high-pace in pursuit of advocacy.

REPORTS

PCCY released:

"Courtwatch 2011-2012: Juvenile Justice in Philadelphia"

"Policy Brief: Why High School Graduation Rates Matter"

"Policy Brief: Trickle Up: The Impact of Increasing Poverty on Educational Outcomes"

"Policy Brief: Trickle Up: Why High School Graduation Rates Matter"

2013

111 BARRIERS TO ENROLLMENT

PCCY issues a report and testifies on 111 barriers to enrollment in Philadelphia charter schools. The district uses PCCY’s research as a guide in their charter renewal process, and, as a result, the barriers are removed, leveling the playing field for all children in the School District.

Donna Cooper is hired as PCCY's Executive Director

MOBILIZATION FOR EDUCATION

PCCY mobilizes hundreds of students, teachers and education advocates for rallies in Philadelphia and Harrisburg calling on the City and State to provide additional resources for schools. The District rehires hundreds of laid off teachers to open schools, albeit with only bare-bones resources.

SCHOOL BREAKFAST CHALLENGE

PCCY designs and leads the first-ever Pennsylvania School Breakfast Challenge, a statewide competition to encourage schools to improve their breakfast programs. Over 9,300 more students start their day by eating breakfast at school as the result of this initiative.

2014

THE BOTTOM LINE IS CHILDREN

PCCY releases the “Bottom Line is Children” reports to document that child poverty, hunger and barriers to good health and good schools are not just limited to Philadelphia. PCCY finds that nearly 30% of the region’s poorest children and 45% of students struggling to read or do math at grade level reside in the suburbs.

REDUCING WAIT TIMES FOR CHILDREN

PCCY documents that children with behavioral health problems wait on average nearly a month for treatment after an initial call requesting services from the City. The City’s Department of Behavioral Health adopts nearly all of PCCY’s recommendations to reduced wait times for children in need of care.

CAMPAIGN FOR FAIR EDUCATION FUNDING

PCCY helps launch a statewide school funding campaign that brings together business, labor, parent, religious and child advocacy leaders to push for equitable funding for public schools. PCCY mobilizes grassroots and grasstops leaders in Southeastern PA by organizing 20 rallies, delivering 4,000 letters to legislators and recruiting nearly 100 constituents to tell their legislators that school funding is a priority.

PRE-K FOR PA

PCCY helps launch the Pre-K for PA campaign to make high-quality pre-k available to every 3- and 4-year old child in Pennsylvania. Described by state leaders as one of the most effective statewide advocacy efforts in decades, the campaign lays the groundwork for a $100 million increase in state funds for Pre-K during its first three years.

COVERING REPLACEMENT EYEGLASSES

PCCY persuades the state to require CHIP providers to pay for one pair of replacement eyeglasses annually by organizing 497 parents and health care advocates to send letters requesting the change. Prior to the change, if a child lost or broke her glasses, it was left to the individual insurance companies to decide whether they would cover a replacement pair.

2015

READ BY 4TH

Responding to the fact that more than 50% of Philadelphia school children enter 4th grade unable to read on grade level, PCCY leads a groundbreaking effort to organize Read by 4th, a six-year collective impact strategy. The campaign has since leveraged $30.4 million in private funding and redirected millions more in public funds to after school programs and summer camps that promote early literacy.

DREAM CARE

PCCY’s groundbreaking research reveals that a shocking 85% of parents of undocumented children delay or forgo medical care for their children because they don’t have health insurance. This finding motivates PCCY to launch the Dream Care Coalition to change state policy that makes 24,000 undocumented children ineligible to enroll in public health insurance. The coalition, which subsequently grows to over 75 health care and social justice organizations, educates state leaders about the importance of covering all kids.

SCHOOL PLAY

PCCY sparks a new and creative dialogue about school funding by commissioning “School Play,” an original theatrical production based on 4,000 letters from students and 100 interviews about the state of Pennsylvania schools. The show completes a 13-city tour reaching over 1,000 parents and community members, many of whom write letters and postcards to their legislators demanding increased funding for public schools.

CHILDREN'S PLEDGE

PCCY’s Children’s Pledge, endorsed by 29 leading child-serving organizations in Philadelphia, is signed by every major candidate for Mayor. The pledge commits these candidates to direct more city funding to schools, universal pre-k and upgrades to libraries and recreation centers.

2016

SODA TAX

PCCY is front and center as Philadelphia makes history as the first major U.S. city to enact a soda tax, building support for 6,500 new free pre-k seats, community schools, and major new investments in parks, libraries, and recreation centers. PCCY organizes a vocal coalition of pre-k providers, labor, education advocates and community groups and its social media campaign supporting the soda tax generates 175,000 views.

PRE-K FOR PA ROUNDTABLE

US House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi, Governor Tom Wolf, Mayor Jim Kenney, former Lt. Governor James Cawley and incoming Congressman Dwight Evans attend PCCY’s historic roundtable on Pre-K to advance the message that with sufficient and smart alignment of federal, state and local investments in pre-K, every child can start school ready to learn.

EDUCATION FUNDING FORMULA

PCCY wins a major victory when the state legislature adopts a new basic education funding formula that adjusts for factors like poverty and community wealth. PCCY shares its expertise with decision-makers and brings 480 local advocates to Harrisburg to deliver a strong message that schools need fair funding now.

LEFT OUT

PCCY releases new research on the status of children in Philadelphia, Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties that documents that despite the economic recovery, every school district in each of the counties has more low-income children than at the depth of the last recession. PCCY shares the results at 10 public forums attended by over 500 citizens.

"Left Out: The Status of Children in Bucks County"

"Left Out: The Status of Children in Chester County"

"Left Out: The Status of Children in Delaware County"

"Left Out: The Status of Children in Montgomery County"

"Left Out: The Status of Children in Philadelphia County"

2017

CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING PREVENTION

PCCY persuades Mayor Jim Kenney to create the Philadelphia Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Advisory Group and, as a member of the group, pushes for strong new recommendations to protect kids from exposure to lead. PCCY follow up by launching a new #LeadFreePhilly coalition to build broad-based support for new measures to protect kids from deteriorating lead paint in their homes.

ACCESS TO INFANT TODDLER CARE

PCCY launches a new research and planning process to develop a strategy to increase access to high-quality infant/toddler care for low-income families that will make it possible to have a well-trained infant care workforce, stable and sufficient payment for care, and highly engaged parents.

MINECRAFT

PCCY hosts a first-of-its-kind Minecraft gaming and STEM event for kids, the Block By Block Party! Upwards of 1,500 parents and children, scores of volunteers and representatives from child-focused organizations gather for a fundraising extravaganza at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia to support PCCY’s work and fund a grant, modeled after the Picasso Project grants, for hi-tech learning in public schools.

2018

PICASSO PROJECT TURNS 15

The Picasso Project turns 15 years old. This award-winning arts education initiative celebrates providing grants for 311 arts and community partners to lead one-of-a-kind projects in the visual and performing arts in 101 different Philadelphia public schools, inspiring over 44,000 students.

UNCHARTED TERRITORY

PCCY publishes the well-received report, Uncharted Territory: Implications of Rising Charter Enrollment in the Southeastern Pennsylvania Suburbs, showing that while charter school enrollment and costs have grown in the suburbs, their academic achievement and fiscal outlook remains stagnant.

"Uncharted Territory: Implications of Rising Charter Enrollment in the Southeastern Pennsylvania Suburbs"

STEMCRAFT

PCCY holds its second Minecraft and STEM event–another smash hit with kids and families. The event thrills guests with Minecraft building challenges, a STEM fair with over 30 organizations, interactive exhibits and presentations, coding workshops, special guest Tracey Baptiste, and so much more!

JUVENILE RESIDENTIAL FACILITY REFORMS

Bringing together city and state officials, child welfare experts, and advocacy organizations, PCCY pushes for desperately needed reforms to Philadelphia’s juvenile residential facility placement policies to reduce the city’s reliance on such facilities, end abuse, increase oversight, and improve quality and outcomes to give children living in these facilities the best chance at success.

CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING SUMMIT

PCCY holds Philadelphia’s first childhood lead poisoning summit as part of its campaign to enact a more effective lead law.

2019

DRIVING LEAD FREE ADVOCACY

PCCY continues to drive the Lead Free Philly Coalition’s efforts to successfully enact Philadelphia’s new and improved lead law, touted as the nation’s most protective.

PA FAMILIES UNDERWATER

PCCY stuns Southeastern PA with a new series of reports that show the increasing costs of raising children are pushing families underwater, even if they make $75,000 a year. Recommendations include state funding increases for quality childcare and pre-K.

"Underwater: What's Sinking Families in Philadelphia"

"Underwater: What's Sinking Families in Chester County"

"Underwater: What's Sinking Families in Montgomery County"

"Underwater: What's Sinking Families in Bucks County"

"Underwater: What's Sinking Families in Delaware County"

THE GAME PLAN

Some of the region’s top business leaders join forces with PCCY to warn legislators of the economic consequences of continued underfunding of public schools. At the release of The Game Plan, CEOs describe the undue burden on businesses who are unable to find qualified workers among Pennsylvania’s graduates.

"The Game Plan: A Regional Strategy Strengthening Pennsylvania's Workforce"

REALTORS FOR FAIR EDUCATION FUNDING

After PCCY shows how the dramatic inequities in state funding force districts to hike property taxes, which depresses property values, Realtors in the region join PCCY in the fight to end chronic underfunding of the public education system.

10,000TH CHILD!

PCCY serves its 10,000th child during its ninth annual Give Kids Sight Day, the annual day of free vision care for uninsured and underinsured children!

5,000TH CHILD!

During its Give Kids a Smile event, PCCY’s week of free dental care, PCCY celebrates the 5,000th child served over 16 years of service!

ARTS AND EDUCATION SYMPOSIUM

The Picasso Project holds an arts and education symposium with keynote speaker Sean Lane, Senior Consultant for the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, who hails PCCY’s new school-based grants approach (as opposed to Picasso’s traditional classroom-based grants).

2010’s

Fresh Vision & Long-fought Victories 

The decade brings change, with the retirement of the venerable Shelly Yanoff, paving the way for a new leader inspired by the PCCY tradition of fighting for kids and well-connected to city and state lawmakers. Donna Cooper sets forth with an aggressive agenda and boundless energy. While PCCY organizes statewide education coalitions, they are winning landmark victories at home and taking on tough issues facing poor and immigrant children.

2020

40 Ways PCCY is Looking Out for Children During COVID-19

Teen Town Hall on Race

Weeks after George Floyd's murder, PCCY asked teens from across the region to join U.S Senator Bob Casey, three members of Congress, and 21 state and county elected-officials to talk about race.

Juvenile Justice

PCCY re-establishes its focus on improving the outcomes of children in the juvenile justice and foster care systems.

Pre-k Funding Increase

During a difficult budget year, PCCY successfully fought for a funding increase for high-quality pre-k: $30M in the 2019-20 state budget and $125M in economic relief for the early learning sector from CARES funding.

ISSUE PAPERS

CHILD WELFARE

CHIP

DREAM CARE

EARLY LEARNING

GIVE KIDS SIGHT DAY

GIVE KIDS A SMILE DAY

JUVENILE JUSTICE

LEAD PAINT POISONING

PUBLIC EDUCATION

PICASSO PROJECT

SODA TAX

2020’s

Children First: A New Era

The decade begins on the heels of an historic victory in the fight to protect children from lead paint poisoning, an issue plaguing children since the dawn of PCCY. PCCY has been improving the lives of children by pioneering initiatives and advocating for quality health care, child care and education for four decades. The dawn of this new era sets forth with a defining moment as the citizens of PCCY—mission firmly intact—demand attention for their core constituency and guiding light in the organization’s name: Children First.